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EPA's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR)

Wednesday, October 12, 2016


The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announces the release of its Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I Solicitation (https://www.epa.gov/sbir/sbir-funding-opportunities) to support the development and commercialization of innovative environmental technologies. The solicitation is posted on FedConnect, and all applications must be submitted through this electronic system.

EPA is one of 11 federal agencies that participates in the SBIR Program as a result of the Small Business Innovation Development Act of 1982. EPA is calling for small businesses to apply for Phase I awards up to $100,000 to demonstrate proof of concept in the following topic areas: air and climate, manufacturing, toxic chemicals, water, water and homeland security, and greener buildings. See the full solicitation for specific subtopics under each topic area and for details on how to apply. Successful Phase I companies are eligible to apply for Phase II funding, up to $300,000 for two years with a commercialization option of up to $100,000, to further develop and commercialize their technologies.

For general information on how to apply, visit https://www.epa.gov/sbir/how-apply-sbir-contract.


Missed the June 14, 2016, webinar on how to apply for the 2016 EPA SBIR Phase I Solicitation? Learn more: https://www.epa.gov/sbir/sbir-special-announcements

The EPA SBIR Program is part of EPA's Sustainable and Healthy (SHC) research program.

Deltech, Inc.

Tuesday, March 31, 2015
Deltech, Inc.
Owner: Mary Stevenson

Story written by: Chris McCloskey
Photography: Chris McCloskey and courtesy of Deltech, Inc.


Deltech Inc. designs and builds furnaces for the production of scientific products, from laboratory implements to semi-conductor components.

Deltech is a small, family-run company with a large impact. It began in 1968 as an engineering services company for the mining industry. The co-founders, Calvin L. Stevenson and Donald J. Drinkwater, were mining engineers. Deltech built its first furnace for Coors Tek, then known as Coors Porcelain. Their second customer was Los Alamos National Laboratories. 

Mary Stevenson, Calvin Stevenson’s wife, is the current president of Deltech and their son, a master’s-level mechanical engineer, is Deltech’s engineering manager.  Stevenson explains the company’s focus, “We listened to what the ceramist wanted to accomplish and what his processes involved, and then set out to design and build the furnace to help him do the job.” 

In the 1990’s, Deltech supplied lab furnaces for use in processing semiconductors and fuel-cell, biomedical, and fiber-optics components. In 2000, the company built its largest furnace for use in the manufacture of a composite mirror for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s F.I.R.S.T. project. Stevenson describes the most interesting product Deltech designed and built as a positive-pressure furnace for the National High Magnetics Lab at Florida State University.  Stevenson adds, “Deltech was the only bidder for this job, which is not uncommon.” Today, Deltech furnaces can be found at universities and laboratories worldwide.  Stevenson said, “The company’s best advertisement has always been the referrals received from its customers.”

As Deltech celebrates its 47th anniversary, Stevenson looks back on an exciting track record for leading industrial scientific manufacturing and learning how to translate their expertise into business success.

In 2007, the company’s accountant pointed out that Deltech’s high-end production and position in the competitive market were not reflected in the company’s profits. At that point, Stevenson attended a meeting of the Adams County Economic Development Council where she heard about the services of the Small Business Development Center.  

The North Metro Denver SBDC matched Stevenson with a manufacturing consultant who began working with her from the first meeting, providing specific ideas for a business plan to align the sides of engineering and accounting. The consultant was able to translate his years of experience working in manufacturing into innovative solutions for Deltech’s financial stability.  After fully utilizing this consultant’s production expertise, Stevenson was referred to a consultant who specializes in marketing. This consultant joined the effort to provide Deltech with insight on effective advertising, competition research, and market analysis.


Today, Stevenson describes the high point of the company’s progress as providing the next generation the ability to take over the business in terms of engineering education and experience, combined with a solid grasp of business finances and marketing. 

Deltech’s trademark, “We Build the Furnace to Fit Your Need” is stronger than ever.